QOTW: What do you write?

I’m pretty sure everyone who reads this blog uses their stash of notebooks and pens for different reasons. What do you use yours for?

School notes?

Journaling?

Scribbling notes about your day?

Notes for an upcoming story or perhaps you even handwrite your stories in them?

Maybe something else? Hit the comments and tell us what you like to write about most!

5 thoughts on “QOTW: What do you write?

  1. Oooh…err…that’s a tough one! Notes (usually about pens/stationery), journaling (usually about pens/stationery), blogging reviews and posts (yes, you guessed it, usually about pens/stationery) and sometimes story ideas, which thankfully have nothing whatever to do with pens/stationery! 😉

  2. I have a certain type of notebook I use for school notes…usually the nice mead flexbinders that I got on sale. And then for journaling I have some various type of composition book…I like them best, they expand better than moleskines if you tape stuff in them. I also keep lists in them. Lots and lots of lists. What animes to watch, what books to read, TV shows and comic books I should check out. Groceries I should get, things I need to finish for the day, story ideas and characters in a story. I also handwrite the first rough draft/beginning of most stories, and then move them to the computer and edit/finish them there. I also write down random images I get, or story ideas. For some reason typing stuff up as notes or journaling that way doesn’t feel as organizing and good to my mind as writing it all down and dating it.

  3. Hmmm. Lists. Doodles. More lists. Notes on things I see when I’m out. More lists. I also use them as business card holders (I stick them in with masking tape folded over to make double-sided) – they’re a much nicer way to store business cards than plastic business card holders (imo). Sporadic journalling. More lists….

  4. Usually notes about pens. Working at a fine-writing retailer will do that to you. I’m in the process of digesting the infamous David Allen book, “Getting Things Done,” which requires a lot of writing and note-taking to catalog the daily inputs, or “stuff,” as he calls it. I also journal.